Flight Attendant 'Takes Custody' of Baby After Mom Slap

| by Mark Berman Opposing Views

Not all flight attendants are like JetBlue's Steven Slater -- some of them act responsibly. Take Beverly McCurley, who briefly took custody of a baby after seeing her mother slap her.

It happened on board a Southwest Airlines flight bound for Albuquerque on Monday. According to a police report, Lea Ann and Joseph Cid were arguing, trying to get their 13-month-old daughter to stop crying, when passengers say the mother slapped the baby. That's when flight attendant Beverly McCurley jumped into action.

The officer wrote:

"McCurley further stated she walked to the rear of the aircraft and observed the mother of the child identified as Lee Ann Cid strike the child with an open hand on the face in an attempt to get the child to stop crying. McCurley further stated the mother appeared agitated with the child and that the husband continued to yell at his wife to shut up due to her screaming at the child."

McCurley quickly took control of the situation:

"McCurley then stated she took the child from the mother due to her behavior and walked to the rear of the aircraft with the child identified as a 13-month-old female. McCurley then stated the father identified as Joseph C. Cid walked back to the rear of the aircraft, took custody of the child and stood on the rear of the aircraft until the child fell asleep."

However, the airline had a slightly different version of the events. While it confirmed there was an issue on the flight, Southwest denied that the flight attendant took "custody" of the baby.

"What you read about the flight attendant taking the baby is not the case. She did it as a 'Would you like me to bounce your baby for you?'" Southwest Airlines representative Whitney Eichinger told ABC News.

"The family on board was having an altercation and their young child was upset. Our flight attendant offered to the parent -- offered to hold the child on board. Our attendants do that from time to time just to soothe the crying babies because they are used to walking up and down the aisles."

Either way, police met the plane when it landed in Albuquerque, and questioned the parents as a  "precaution for the child." They found they did not abuse the girl, and allowed them to continue their travels.

Police said McCurley did the right thing. "I think it was a solid move from the part of the flight attendant to take custody of the child," said airport police chief Marshall Katz. "It neutralized the situation, it calmed everybody down."