Society

Nintendo Fixes Gay Marriage ‘Bug’ in Tomodachi Game

| by Lauren Schiff

The Nintendo game ‘Tomodachi Collection: New Life’ offers players a world of virtual opportunities. Users’ interests peaked recently, however, when they realized that in the game men could marry other men as well as raise families.

NPR says Tomodachi (Japanese for ‘friends’) as a game in which players can “reflect themselves” through creating a virtual life.” An interesting bit is that same-sex relationships in the game were limited to male-to-male interactions; female characters did not have the same capabilities.

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Nintendo released an update Monday to patch several ‘flaws’ in the game, including eliminating the ability to create “human relationships that are ‘funny’ or ‘strange,’ depending on how you translate the company's message in Japanese,” says NPR. The fix is said to “remove the possibility of same-sex marriage.”

Users, however, seem to enjoy the marriage equality offered by the game. “Online in Japan,” reports Kotaku, “there were many internet users who said they planned on getting this game only after learning of this bug—er, feature.”

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And apparently there have been a number of games that offer same-sex relationship features. “In 2009,” reports NPR, “The Sims 3 included the feature. In the Facebook game FrontierVille, hundreds of thousands of couples joined in same-sex marriages.” In the latter case, the feature was first considered to be a "bug."

Nintendo has not yet declared officially whether the situation with Tomodachi is technically being considered a ‘bug.’ Regardless, the good news is, says Escapist Magazine, that “Tomodachi Collection players who want to continue with support for gay couples may do so by simply not installing the update.” Avoiding the update, though, may have side effects like not being able to save your place in the game. 

Sources: Escapist Magazine, Kotaku, NPR