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Actress Brittany Murphy May Have Been Deliberately Poisoned, New Lab Report States

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According to a new lab report commissioned by her father, Brittany Murphy was killed by poisoning possibly “administered by a third party perpetrator with likely criminal intent,” according to documents reproduced on the Examiner.com website.

Murphy, the star of such films as Clueless and 8 Mile, died on Dec. 20, 2009 at age 32. The cause of death was ruled to be a combination of pneumonia and anemia as well as a toxic level of legal over-the-counter and prescription medications.

On May 23 of the following year, Murphy’s husband, Simon Monjack, died in the same house, also from a combination of pneumonia and anemia.

The couple had complained of high levels of toxic mold in the house, but the coroner ruled that out as a contributing factor in Murphy’s death.

The new lab report commissioned by Murphy’s father, Angelo Bertolotti, raises a far more sinister possibility.

At the time of the actress’s death, there were widespread reports alleging her drug use as well as eating disorders and other psychological problems. But Bertolotti always contended that such rumors were false.

“Vicious rumors, spread by tabloids, unfairly smeared Brittany’s reputation,” Angelo told the Examiner, which first circulated the story of the new report. “My daughter was neither anorexic nor a drug junkie, as they repeatedly implied.”

Bertolotti said that his daughter and her husband had been ridiculed by the press for publicly asserting that they were somehow under surveillance and in fear for their lives.

“There will be justice for Brittany,” he said.

The report reproduced on the Examiner says: “Ten (10) of the heavy metals evaluated were detected at levels higher that the WHO [The World Health Organization] high levels. Testing the hair strand sample identified as” back of the head” we have detected ten (10) heavy metals at levels above the WHO high levels recommendation.”

High levels of heavy metals are commonly found in poisons used to kill pests such as rats or insects.

SOURCES: Examiner.com, Bustle, Wikipedia