Health

Mitzi Dulan's Egg Recall Update

| by Mitzi Dulan

EGGS have become an important staple in our diet: a stabilizer in baked goods, an emulsifier in condiments, and of course, as a yummy breakfast food! In addition, they are a great source of protein and other important nutrients.

So, it can be quite disturbing to hear there is a massive egg recall. Running to check your eggs, fretting over whether the eggs you fed your kids yesterday morning were contaminated with salmonella, all can be very frightening.

Salmonella egg-testing by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has led to over a half-billion, multistate EGG RECALL by Wright County Egg in Galt, IA. Their eggs are distributed across California, Illinois, Missouri, Colorado, Nebraska, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa and then sold nationwide. These eggs are sold under the BRAND NAMES: Lucerne, Albertson, Mountain Dairy, Ralph’s, Boomsma’s, Sunshine, Hillandale, Trafficanda, Farm Fresh, Shoreland, Lund, Dutch Farms and Kemps.

The recalled eggs have JULIAN DATES ranging from 136 to 225 and plant numbers 1026, 1413, and 1946. Beginning with the letter P, the dates and codes are stamped on the egg carton for example: P-1946 223.If you have suspicious eggs, be sure to throw them out or you can get a refund if the uneaten portion is returned in their original carton to the store where they were bought.

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Salmonella can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections. SYMPTOMS typically occur within 72 hours of eating the contaminated product and include: fever, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. If you think you may have become ill from eating recalled eggs, please contact your health provider.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is working with public health partners and FDA to inspect the farms and determine the source of the contamination. Environmental measures are being taken to look into farm conditions and practices.

This recall does not mean we need to quit eating eggs all together. But there are a few steps we can take to keep from getting infected:
• Check your eggs! If your eggs have the plant number and date range mentioned above, throw them out or return them.
• Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water after coming in contact with raw eggs.
• Do not eat cracked or open eggs
• Cook eggs thoroughly to where the white and yolk are both firm
• Eat cooked eggs immediately.

On a positive note, this egg scare is driving consumers to FARMER’S MARKETS. It may have taken a salmonella outbreak, but our LOCAL FARMERS are beginning to get some of the appreciation they deserve.

Research assistance provided by Ashley Ingram

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