Myth or Facts: Mitzi Dulan's Diet and Exercise Quiz Part II

| by Mitzi Dulan

Ready for another round of Diet Quiz? (Check out Diet Quiz Part I in case you missed it!!)

Test your Diet IQ by deciding whether these common health claims are truth or myths.

1. You can get a good workout in 30 minutes or less

True. Many of us tend to get stuck in the all or nothing mentality when it comes to working out.  In reality, any bit of exercise you can squeeze into your day–whether it’s taking the stairs instead of the elevator or going for a walk during your lunch break–can make a difference in your waistline!   For quick and effective gym workouts, try Tabata intervals or HIIT training–both proven to burn as many (or more!) calories as a one hour long sweat session at the gym.

2. Carbs are FATTENING

False. While carbs have gotten a bad rap over the years as being a weight loss enemy, most of the ones found in our diet (think: bread, pasta, oatmeal, cereal, fruits, beans vegetables) contain very little to no fat! It is only when these foods are eaten in excess (which is, by the way, very common), or combined with other high fat ingredients (butter, whole milk, etc.) that the extra glucose gets stored as fat in our bodies.  Make sure you watch your portions and your carbs should be coming from whole grains, fruits and vegetables. Carbohydrates are an efficient energy source for our brains and bodies, and contain beneficial phytonutrients, vitamins, and fiber!

3. Eating nuts may help you lose weight

True. While nuts are high in calories and fat, they can be a healthy addition to your diet when eaten in moderation. Nuts are made up of heart-healthy monounsaturated fats (the best kind for you!) which have been proven to aid in weight loss and fight fat in your midsection! The combination of healthy fat and protein found in nuts can help keep you satisfied and your hunger at bay, while also providing fiber, magnesium, copper and other key minerals. The most nutritious tree nut is an almond. Almonds have 6 grams of protein and 3.5 grams of fiber per serving and the crunch is very satisfying!

4. You should always eat 5-6 meals a day to lose weight

False. In my 15 years experience as a registered dietitian, I think this is one of the biggest myths I hear. I am much more of a believer in 3 meals per day + 1 snack. When people are constantly eating all day long I have found they usually consume excess calories. Instead, eat 3 solid meals that will satisfy you for a good 4 hours and aim to avoid eating after dinner. I typically encourage an afternoon snack with some protein like Oikos Honey Greek Yogurt.

5. Strength training will give women  “man-muscles”

False. It’s a scientifically proven fact that women don’t contain enough testosterone in their bodies to “bulk up” like our male counterparts when strength training. In fact, this type of conditioning can be a key tool in getting that lean and toned body that many women are looking for. That’s because when we turn fat into muscle, our bodies burn even more calories, even while we sleep! Strength training doesn’t just have to include lifting weights; you can also perform exercises using your own body weight (pushups, situps), BOSU balls, resistance bands—even aquatic strength training in a pool!   Strengthening our muscles also helps to build stronger bones and prevent osteoporosis—a major health concern among older women.

So tell me, how did your Diet Quiz Part 2 scores stack up compared to Part 1? Any fact/fiction that surprised you?

Assistance provided by Kristen Carlucci

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