Designing the Bloodhound: a Car that Goes 1,000 MPH

| by Mark Berman Opposing Views

Work is currently underway in England to build a car that can go at least 1,000 mph. Engineers just passed a major milestone -- they've figured out how to keep the car on the ground at that incredible speed.

According to a BBC report, the car -- known as the Bloodhound -- is so aerodynamic, that at high speeds there would be so much lift in the rear, it would literally fly. But now engineers think they have a design that will keep those rear wheels from lifting off.

"We're very close now to fixing the exterior aero surface, which really opens the floodgates to the rest of the design work to really get going," said John Piper, Bloodhound's technical director.

Engineers can thank the folks at Intel and its computing power for helping to solve the problem. Before Intel came aboard, the design team worked through 11 different designs in the past 18 months. Using Intel's technolgy, engineers ran through 55 possibilities in just eight weeks.

The current land speed record is 763 mph. The Bloodhound people not only want to break that, they want to shatter it by going at least 1,000 ph. The plan is to have the car ready sometime late in 2011, and make the record attempt on a dry lakebed in South Africa.