Religion

Ken Ham Tells Bill Nye: The Word 'Science' Has Been Hijacked By Secularists (Video)

| by Sarah Fruchtnicht

During a two-and-a-half hour debate with science educator Bill Nye, Creationist Ken Ham argued that scientists can also be creationists and believe that the universe is only 6,000 years old.

Held at Kentucky’s Creation Museum Tuesday night, Ham gave the first opening statement. 

"The Bible is the word of God," Ham said. "I admit that's where I start from."

He mentioned Raymond Damadian, the inventor of the MRI machine, as an exemplary scientist and biblical creationist - proving that that the two are compatible.

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This judge looked an inmate square in the eyes and did something that left the entire courtroom in tears:

"I believe the word 'science' has been hijacked by secularists," he added.

"If we accept Mr. Ham's point of view ... that the Bible serves as a science text and he and his followers will interpret that for you, I want you to consider what that means," Nye argued. "It means that Mr. Ham's word is to be more respected than what you can observe in nature, what you can find in your backyard in Kentucky."

"How could there be billions of stars more distant than 6,000 years, if the world is only 6,000 years old?" Nye asked.

"I just want to remind us all there are billions of people in the world who are deeply religious, who get enriched by the wonderful sense of community by their religion," he said. "But these same people do not embrace the extraordinary view that the Earth is somehow only 6,000 years old."

When a member of the audience asked where matter comes from, Nye said scientists are attempting to answer that question everyday. Ham said he already knows the answer.

"Bill, I want to tell you, there is a book that tells where atoms come from, and its starts out, 'In the beginning ...'”

The pair’s final question was, “What is the one thing more than anything else upon which you base your belief?”

Ham said the Bible. Nye said science.

The event was a boon for the museum, which opened in 2007.

Ham said the wide interest in the debate, “shows you that the majority of people out there, they're interested in this topic, they want to know about this, they don't want debate shut down.” 

Sources: TIME, ABC