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Tom Cruise's Ex-Girlfriend Nazanin Boniadi Rips Scientology in Rap Created by Titziano Lugli and Mark Rathbun

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In spite of, or rather in light of, its popularity among celebrities, the church of Scientology has long been criticized for its practices and beliefs. Now, more bad press is heading its way after former scientologists released a rap song calling out church leader David Miscavige and its celebrity endorsers.

The rap -- according to Gawker -- was produced by Los Angeles-based Italian producer Titziano Lugli, who invited various ex-communicated or former scientologists to write and sing a collaborative rap song slamming the church and its leader.

Lugli, who was ex-communicated from the church in 2010, included prominent former Scientology figures such as Mark Rathbun, who was high up in the church’s hierarchy but left in 2004, which Rathbun says is due to ethical issues he had surrounding Miscaviage’s ordering of the secret surveillance of Tom Cruise after his divorce from actress Nicole Kidman.

The most scandalous contributor, however, is Iranian-born actress Nazanin Boniadi. After Cruise’s split with Kidman, Miscaviage feared Crusie’s next girlfriend would not be within Scientology and so issued a church-sanctioned search for his next girlfriend, according to Vanity Fair’s Maureen Orth.

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Orth revealed that Boniadi was Miscavige’s personal pick for Cruise, but their relationship was rumored to have lasted only briefly, and ended with Boniadi leaving the church. The first blatant proof of Boniadi’s break with the church is this rap, where she sings, “This ain't no road to freedom / It's a blind alley, like Kirstie Alley / Travolta, and Cruise, but we ain’t no fools.”

Lugli told Gawker.com that the rap is mostly about Boniadi’s story, as well as an overall critique of Scientology. Lugli and Rathbun plan to eventually sell the song as a single and use the money to provide for people leaving the church with nothing.