Ted Nugent is Wrong About Gun Background Checks, Says His Brother Jeffrey

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Jeffrey Nugent, brother of outspoken, ultra-conservative rocker Ted Nugent, is speaking out against recent comments his brother has made about gun rights.

Ted, who spoke earlier this month at a Houston NRA conference, vehemently decries any attempts to limit gun freedoms, such as greater background checks. Jeffrey began to get some heat because of his brother’s extremism, and so wrote an op-ed piece in the Washington Post about his support of greater background checks.

"I agree with Ted that our constitutional right to bear arms should not be undermined," wrote Jeffrey Nugent. "I want all those who are qualified to purchase a gun to be able to do so. But — and here is where I part ways with my brother — not everyone is qualified to own a gun, so expanded background checks should be a legislative priority."

Jeffrey, the former chief executive and president of Revlon, explains in his piece that he and his brother both are members of the NRA, own many guns between the two of them, and have gone hunting together for years. The difference is: Jeffrey doesn’t believe background checks infringe on his Second Amendment right, but are rather a necessary and logical precaution.

“As of today, a convicted felon can find a gun show or private seller and buy a firearm without a background check. That loophole should be closed,” Jeffrey wrote. “Every gun transaction must include a thorough background check. Why would responsible gun owners want to protect people who threaten not only our safety but our gun rights?”

Jeffrey also brings up that people must obtain a license before driving or buying a car because like guns, cars can be dangerous and have the potential to kill.

Even Americans’ most basic freedom — the First Amendment right to free speech — has reasonable restrictions on it for the overall safety of society. People cannot go around yelling “fire!” in a crowded theater, for instance, because its potential for harm outweighs the person’s right to free speech.

“The NRA has it wrong: Irresponsible gun owners are bad for everyone,” Jeffrey wrote. “If you shouldn’t have access to a gun, then there should be no way for you to access a gun! Can anyone argue with that?”

Sources: Huffington Post, Washington Post