Health

Pat Robertson Believes Margaret Sanger, Founder of Planned Parenthood, Advocated to Euthanize Minorities

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According to Pat Robertson, the founder of Planned Parenthood Margaret Sanger was nothing more than an inspiration for Adolf Hitler’s genocide.

Robertson, a televangelist and frequent face on “The 700 Club” said Wednesday that Sanger’s writings advocated for the extermination of black people by driving them towards euthanasia.

"Go back and read her writings," Robertson said, beginning a completely inaccurate tirade about Sanger’s history. "What Margaret Sanger believed was there were defective, genetically defective people. They were Roman Catholics, they were evangelical protestants, they were Southern Europeans, they were Latinos and especially, they were African Americans."

Robertson also said Sanger worked to find prominent black leaders to mask her actual intent, which was to lead them all towards extinction. These comments come after Robertson’s April accusation on the show that Sanger “set the stage” for Hilter and his ideologies.

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Sanger’s grandson Alexander Sanger, the current Chair of the International Planned Parenthood Council, sent a statement to the Huffington Post challenging Robertson’s grossly inaccurate statements.

“The infamous out of context quote that she wanted to find prominent Negro physicians to help with birth control in the South was to counteract Black fears of birth control so that Black women could control their family size just as whites were doing,” Alexander wrote. “These statements by Robertson are part of a long pattern of falsehoods and distortions by the anti-birth control crowd who have no valid arguments against birth control, so they resort to smearing a women who has been dead for a half century.”

Alexander goes on to admit that his grandmother did align with the eugenics movement but never advocated for abortions or genocide of blacks because they were inferior. Though she was seen as a radical at the time, she simply wanted minority populations to have the same birth control options as white women.

Sources: Huffington Post, Right Wing Watch