Society

Ex-Hacker Apologizes to Paris Hilton for Hacking Nude Pictures (Video)

| by Michael Allen

Ex-hacker Cameron Lacroix publicly apologized to reality TV star Paris Hilton for hacking nude pictures from her cellphone in 2005.

After being prodded by NBC News reporter Jeff Rossen (video below), Lacroix said, "Paris, I’m sorry I put your information online I should never have done it. I wouldn’t want it done to me.”

“It all started because I wanted a T-Mobile phone,” added Lacroix. “Once I got in there, I realized, ‘Hey, I have access to everybody’s stuff!’”

After Hilton did a commercial for Sidekick cell phones, Lacroix assumed she owned one of the devices.

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This judge looked an inmate square in the eyes and did something that left the entire courtroom in tears:

“Sure enough, it was under her name. I went into it and was shocked at what I saw,” said Lacroix, who uploaded Hilton’s contacts, text messages and nude pics to the web.

“I wanted to be a celebrity,” stated Lacroix. “It was mind-blowing for me... I felt famous."

Lacroix hacked into Hilton’s cell phone at age 16 and was sentenced to 11 months in a juvenile facility, noted The Washington Post. At the time, Lacroix also pleaded guilty to making bomb threats at two schools, hacking into a phone company's network and joining a group attack on the data-collection company LexisNexis.

Lacroix, who is now 26 years old, is about to begin another sentence in a federal prison for reportedly hacking thousands of credit card numbers that were used to buy gift cards, changing friends' grades at a local college and hacking Burger King's Twitter account.

“It was easy, too easy,” Lacroix said of companies' websites. “It was like a game, like a challenge, I guess.”

Lacroix, a high school dropout, claimed that his hacking was an escape from reality, which included his mother's suicide in New Bedford, Mass.

The Office of the U.S. Attorney for Massachusetts says that Lacroix has aided them with information on how hackers do their deeds.

Lacroix says consumers' credit cards may still be vulnerable even if their data is encrypted.

“It’s got to be decrypted at some point,” stated Lacroix. “That’s when you go in.”

Sources: The Washington Post, NBC News