Entertainment

Celebrities Slam Seth McFarlane’s Boob Song

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It’s just over a week since the Oscars, and the outrage concerning Seth McFarlane’s We Saw Your Boobs song shows no sign of abating, with Hollywood stars Jamie Lee Curtis and Geena Davis adding their voices to those who think jokes about people portraying real-life rape victims might, you know, be a step backwards in our progress as humans.

If you missed both the song and the furore, the Family Guy creator chose to open the Academy Award ceremony he was hosting with an extended scene in which William Shatner came back from the future to show him how he ruined the Oscars show.
 
One example was a song and dance number in which Seth and a male chorus listed all the female actors whose breasts have been exposed on screen. You know, the kind of thing Peter Griffin would do.
 
Only, some of those named in his “ironic” comedy song were portraying victims of rape, in the scenes in which they were naked. Two of those films, The Accused and Boys Don’t Cry were based on true stories. That’s right, a comedy song about depictions of real rape.
 
*Stewart Lee voice* It’s just a joke, like what they have on Family Guy.
 
Jamie Lee Curtis has aired her disappointment at the Academy for endorsing the song, in a blog on Huff post, writing:
 
“I was offended by the Oscar show.I am sorry that this is what we are talking about and not Argo's lovely win or Jennifer's amazing performance or Daniel's eloquence and humor and grace or the fallout from the sequester.

What we will be talking about is Seth's lack of class and a 14-year-old boy's derogatory word for one of the most beautiful, motherly and literally nurturing parts of the female form.”
 
While Geena Davis was far more direct in her disgust. Addressing the California State Assembly in Sacramento, Geena praised Pixar’s Oscar winning animation Brave as being a positive example for Brave, but added:
 
“It's a shame that that triumph was enveloped in an awards ceremony containing disrespect for women. But it helps illustrate how tone-deaf we can still be regarding the status of women.”