Dead Baby Found In Texas High School Bathroom

| by Sheena Vasani
South Houston High SchoolSouth Houston High School

A Texas school custodian reportedly discovered a dead newborn baby in South Houston High School’s bathroom Jan. 13

"Last night, at about 9 p.m., one of the custodians … found a body in one of the bathrooms," a Pasadena Independent School District spokeswoman said during a press conference Jan.14, reports People magazine. "It was an infant ... you might refer to it as a fetus." 

She added: "Immediately, the police were contacted. When they arrived, they determined the baby was not alive."

The mother, unidentified because she is a minor, has been taken in for medical care after surveillance videos identified her.

The mother is a student at the high school and will not be arrested at this time, according to People. She reportedly did not tell her family she was pregnant.

"Our concern is that she will be OK," said the spokeswoman. "It's a sad, sad situation." 

An autopsy will be performed on the body. It is not yet clear whether the baby was born a stillborn or alive. Police are currently investigating the case.

According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, teen mothers are far more likely to experience medical complications during pregnancy and birth.

“Adolescent pregnancy is associated with higher rates of illness and death for both the mother and infant,” it writes on its website. “The younger a mother is below age 20, the greater the risk of her infant dying during the first year of life. It is very important for pregnant teens to have early and adequate prenatal care.”

Pew Research reveals teen pregnancy has been decreasing for years in the U.S. and is currently at a historical low.

“Over the past few decades, birthrates have not only fallen among teens of all races and ethnicities reported, but have fallen the most for those with the highest rates ... Every state in the nation, as well as the District of Columbia, has a lower teen birthrate than it did in the early 1990s," it notes.

Sources: People, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Pew Research / Photo credit: Google Maps via People