Sports

Autmatic Bid Formula Finally Released By BCS

| by SportsbookGurus

For NCAA football conferences such as the Mountain West and the Western Athletic Conference, not receiving an automatic big to a BCS bowl game has been frustrating. MWC teams such as BYU, Utah, and TCU are coming off great seasons and do have a valid argument as to why their conference should get that free pass. Boise State from the WAC does as well. The unknowns of why these conferences do not qualify has been a mystery.

The BCS is in the middle of a four-year evaluation period. Only six conferences have sealed automatic bids through the 2013 College Football season (Big East, Big Ten, ACC, Big 12, SEC, and PAC-10). The BCS officials have been widely scrutinized for not revealing the formula that has allowed only these conferences to get an automatic bid. Now, they have finally released this magical formula and what has to be accomplished by conferences to qualify.

“By putting out the data, we’re hoping we can uncomplicate it,” BCS executive director Bill Hancock said.

The BCS announced that they use three methods in determining the strength of a conference which include the ranking of the highest-ranked team from a conference in the final BCS standings, the final regular-season computer ranking of all the teams in a conference and the the number of top 25 teams from a conference in the final BCS standings. The MWC, WAC, Sun Belt, Mid-American, and Conference USA are the five without an automatic bid.

The goal for these conferences is obviously to be ranked among the six best in college football according to the first two categories. At the end of the regular season, the BCS uses a points system that takes into account how each team in a conference is ranked for the third category. Each conference is given a grade, based on those points, and in order to qualify for an automatic bid it must be around 50 percent.

The next four-year-cycle for conferences to get automatic bids does not begin until 2014 and those conferences have not been determined yet. The rankings for the first two years of this cycle have not been released. But, this formula does indicate that how a conference performs each year will determine whether or not they qualify for an automatic bid. That being said, two more strong years by the Mountain West could really shake things up. Last season, Boise and TCU were the first two teams from conferences without automatic bids to receive BCS bids since it was implemented in 1998.

For NCAA football conferences such as the Mountain West and the Western Athletic Conference, not receiving an automatic big to a BCS bowl game has been frustrating. MWC teams such as BYU, Utah, and TCU are coming off great seasons and do have a valid argument as to why their conference should get that free pass. Boise State from the WAC does as well. The unknowns of why these conferences do not qualify has been a mystery.

The BCS is in the middle of a four-year evaluation period. Only six conferences have sealed automatic bids through the 2013 College Football season (Big East, Big Ten, ACC, Big 12, SEC, and PAC-10). The BCS officials have been widely scrutinized for not revealing the formula that has allowed only these conferences to get an automatic bid. Now, they have finally released this magical formula and what has to be accomplished by conferences to qualify.

“By putting out the data, we’re hoping we can uncomplicate it,” BCS executive director Bill Hancock said.

The BCS announced that they use three methods in determining the strength of a conference which include the ranking of the highest-ranked team from a conference in the final BCS standings, the final regular-season computer ranking of all the teams in a conference and the the number of top 25 teams from a conference in the final BCS standings. The MWC, WAC, Sun Belt, Mid-American, and Conference USA are the five without an automatic bid.

The goal for these conferences is obviously to be ranked among the six best in college football according to the first two categories. At the end of the regular season, the BCS uses a points system that takes into account how each team in a conference is ranked for the third category. Each conference is given a grade, based on those points, and in order to qualify for an automatic bid it must be around 50 percent.

The next four-year-cycle for conferences to get automatic bids does not begin until 2014 and those conferences have not been determined yet. The rankings for the first two years of this cycle have not been released. But, this formula does indicate that how a conference performs each year will determine whether or not they qualify for an automatic bid. That being said, two more strong years by the Mountain West could really shake things up. Last season, Boise and TCU were the first two teams from conferences without automatic bids to receive BCS bids since it was implemented in 1998.