MLB Analysis: Milton Bradley Out, Dodgers Bankruptcy and More

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Former All-Star, Seattle Mariners outfielder, Milton Bradley, was designated for assignment yesterday, leaving the enigmatic and temperamental outfielder once again looking for a new job. Bradley along with outfielder Ryan Langerhans were both released as the team called up outfielders Mike Wilson and Carlos Peguero to replace them in time for a series that starts Tuesday in Baltimore.

Bradley signed a three-year, $30 million contract with the Cubs after the ’08 season. There he was suspended for arguing with an umpire, and on another occasion had to be sent home in the middle of a game by then Chicago Cubs manager, Lou Piniella. Seattle traded Carlos Silva for Bradley straight up before the 2010 season and was still on the hook for $12 million this year. The Mariners now have 10 days to trade Bradley, release him, or send him to the minors (he would have to approve that.) 

Bradley, 33, was suspended for one game last week for bumping an umpire, ejected Friday for arguing a called third strike, and booed by home fans over the weekend for the perception he was dogging it on defense.  In the immortal words of Vince Lombardi, “What the hell is goin’ on out there?”

Bradley has now played for eight teams in the majors, including five in the last five seasons. I don’t get it. In almost each and every instance, Bradley as had to leave the team he was playing for under tumultuous circumstances. How is it that MLB teams keep taking a chance on this guy? What did Seattle expect?

Will Frank McCourt Take the Los Angeles Dodgers into Bankruptcy?

Given that Bankruptcy courts don’t have to yield to MLB rules, this strategy is becoming more and more of a realistic possibility as it appears to be Frank McCourt’s only option to regain control of the Dodgers. The Los Angeles Times is reporting that MLB is now preparing for the fact that McCourt might take the Dodgers into bankruptcy court before the league could strip him of the team.

It would appear that from McCourt’s standpoint, this would certainly be a valid strategy to maintain control of the club as Bankruptcy could provide McCourt with both the authority and funding to remain in control of the Dodgers. It won’t be easy however because in court, he would not only have Major League Baseball opposing him, but almost certainly his ex-wife as well.

This situation has gotten way out of control and this franchise is going to suffer both on and off the field, there’s no way around it. I don’t understand two things here; particularly since what we supposedly have here is two savvy business entities, the McCourt enterprise and MLB. 1) Didn’t MLB think about this before they tried to strip McCourt of his team? 2) Why didn’t McCourt do this the very moment Bud Selig and MLB intervened?

Stupidest “Rehab” Ever

The New York Yankees reported yesterday that Phil Hughes’ rehab from his “dead arm” condition is going as planned. “He’s almost completed the first week of a two-week period where he’s not throwing, and then we’ll get him going again,” GM Brian Cashman said.

So the Yankees feel that Hughes has almost completed a period where he has successfully done nothing, and seem to be hopeful that he’ll be able to repeat that again this week? Was there a possibility that Cashman was going to come out and say, “We are very disappointed in the progress of Hughes’ rehab. Phil walked his dog holding the leash with his right hand last Wednesday, and although we gave him a butler like Price Charles, on Friday he placed tooth paste on his own toothbrush using his right hand.”