Alternative Medicine

Cranberry Juice No Good for UTIs?

| by Kate Wharmby Seldman

Cranberry juice may not help cure urinary tract infections after all, new research indicates.

Cathy Wong of’s Alternative Medicine site recently reported on a new study conducted by the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health and published in Clinical Infectious Diseases. In the clinical trial, researchers recruited 319 college women who reported having persistent UTIs. They split the women into two groups. The first group drank two 8-ounce servings of 27% cranberry juice every day, either until they got another UTI, or until six months had passed. The second group drank a placebo juice for six months or until they contracted another UTI. The researchers’ aim was to determine if drinking cranberry juice could protect women against recurring UTIs.

The overall rate of UTI recurrence was 16.9 – that’s for both groups combined. Surprisingly, there were more cases of UTI recurrence in the cranberry-juice group than there were in the placebo group: 20% of the cranberry-juice group experienced recurrences as compared to 14% of the placebo group, suggesting that cranberry juice may not be as useful as previously thought in preventing or treating UTIs. The researchers did note that their placebo juice may have contained the same UTI-preventing substances as cranberry juice – this would simply be an accident, since doctors haven’t yet pinpointed the exact substances in the juice that may help treat UTIs.

Previous studies had indicated that a substance in cranberry juice might stop bacteria from attaching to the walls of the urinary tract.

Originally published at GrannyMed