Guns

19 Facts You Need to Know About Guns

| by Stop Handgun Violence

1. 5 children were killed every day in gun related accidents and suicides committed with a firearm, from 1994-1998.
An average of 5 children were killed every day in gun related accidents and suicides committed with a firearm, from 1994-1998.

2. 40% of American households with children have guns.

3. 22 million children live in homes with at least one firearm.
34% of children in the United States (representing more than 22 million children in 11 million homes) live in homes with at least one firearm. In 69 percent of homes with firearms and children, more than one firearm is present.

4. A gun in the home is 22 times more likely to be used in an unintentional shooting, than to be used to injure or kill in self-defense.
A gun in the home is 22 times more likely to be used in an unintentional shooting, a criminal assault or homicide, or an attempted or completed suicide than to be used to injure or kill in self-defense.

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5. In 1997, gunshot wounds were the second leading cause of injury death for men and women 10-24 years of age.
In 1997, gunshot wounds were the second leading cause of injury death for men and women 10-24 years of age -- second only to motor vehicle crashes -- while the firearm injury death rate among males 15-24 years of age was 42% higher than the motor vehicle traffic injury death rate.

6. In the U.S, children under 15 commit suicide with guns at a rate of eleven times the rate of other countries combined.
For children under the age of 15, the rate of suicide in the United States is twice the rate of other counties. For suicides involving firearms, the rate was almost eleven times the rate of other countries combined.

7. Guns in the home are the primary source for firearms that teenagers use to kill themselves in the United States.
Studies show that guns in the home are the primary source for firearms that teenagers use to kill themselves.

8. 85% of Americans want mandatory handgun registration.
85% of Americans endorse the mandatory registration of handguns and 72% also want mandatory registration of longguns (rifles and shotguns).

9. 85% of Americans want a background check and 5-day waiting period before a handgun is purchased.
85% of Americans want a background check and 5-day waiting period before a handgun is purchased.

10. 95% of Americans think that US made handguns should meet the same safety standards as imported guns.
95% of Americans favor having handguns manufactured in the United States meet the same safety and quality standards that imported guns must meet.

11. 51% of the guns used in crimes by juveniles and people 18 to 24 were acquired by "straw purchasers," people who buy several guns legally through licensed dealers, then sell them to criminals, violent offenders, and kids.
51% of the guns used in crimes by juveniles and people 18 to 24 were acquired by "straw purchasers," people who buy several guns legally through licensed dealers, then sell them to criminals, violent offenders, and kids.

12. More Americans were killed by guns than by war in the 20th Century.
More Americans were killed with guns in the 18-year period between 1979 and 1997 (651,697), than were killed in battle in all wars since 1775 (650,858). And while a sharp drop in gun homicides has contributed to a decline in overall gun deaths since 1993, the 90's will likely exceed the death toll of the 1980s (327,173) and end up being the deadliest decade of the century. By the end of the 1990s, an estimated 350,000 Americans will have been killed in non-military-related firearm incidents during the decade.

13. A classroom is emptied every two days in America by gunfire
In 1998, 3,792 American children and teens (19 and under) died by gunfire in murders, suicides and unintentional shootings. That's more than 10 young people a day.

14. Toy guns and teddy bears have more federal manufacturing regulations than real guns.

15. Every day 79 people are killed by firearms in America.
In 1999 a total of 28,874 persons died from firearm injuries in the United States, down nearly 6 percent from the 30,625 deaths in 1998.

16. 88% of the US population and 80% of US gun owners support childproofing all new handguns.

17. Kids in America are 12 times more likely to be killed by a gun than kids in 25 other industrialized nations combined.
The overall firearm-related death rate among U.S. children aged less than 15 years was nearly 12 times higher than among children in 25 other industrialized countries combined.

18. Guns stored in the home are used 72% of the time when children are accidentally killed and injured, commit suicide with a firearm.
In 72% of unintentional deaths and injuries, suicide, and suicide attempts with a firearm of 0-19 year-olds, the firearm was stored in the residence of the victim, a relative, or a friend.

19. Medical costs from gun injuries and deaths cost $19 billion. The US taxpayer will pay half of that cost.

Direct medical costs for firearm injuries range from $2.3 billion to $4 billion, and additional indirect costs, such as lost potential earnings, are estimated at $19.0 billion.

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FOOTNOTES:

1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Injury
Prevention and Control, National Injury Mortality Statistics, 1994-1998

2. Peter Hart Research Associates Poll, July 1999
3. The RAND Corporation, "Guns in the Family: Firearm Storage Patterns in
U.S. Homes with Children," March 2001, an analysis of the 1994 National
Health Interview Survey and Year 2000 objectives supplement. Also
published as Schuster et al., "Firearm Storage Patterns in U.S. Homes
with Children," American Journal of Public Health 90(4): 588-594, April
2000
4. Journal of Trauma, 1998
5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, June 1999
6. U.S. Department of Justice, March 2000 
7. Injury Prevention, 1999
8. 1998 National Gun Policy Survey of the National Opinion Research Center, University of Chicago
9. 1998 National Gun Policy Survey of the National Opinion Research Center, University of Chicago
10. 1998 National Gun Policy Survey of the National Opinion Research Center, University of Chicago
11. ATF report, Crime Gun Trace Analysis, February 1999
12. Handgun Control 12/30/99 (Press release from CDC data)
13. Unpublished data from the Vital Statistics System, Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, 2000.
14. Centers for Disease Control, National Center for Health Statistics,
Deaths: Final Data for 1999. NVSR Volume 49, No. 8. 114 pp. (PHS)
2001-1120.
15. Johns Hopkins University Center of Gun Policy and Research, 1997/1998
16. Johns Hopkins University Center of Gun Policy and Research, 1997/1998
17. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Rates of Homicide,
Suicide, and Firearm-Related Death Among Children -- 26 Industrialized
Countries," Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 46(05): 101-105,
February 07, 1997.
18. Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center Study, Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, August 1999
19. Miller and Cohen, Textbook of Penetrating Trauma, 1995; American
Academy of Pediatrics, 2000; Journal of American Medical Association,
June 1995; Annals of Internal Medicine, 1998

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